RPH hosts teen driving week


Teen driving tips:

Always wear a seat belt. Make sure you and all passengers are properly restrained. It is the single best thing you can do to avoid injury in the event of a car crash. Using your seat belt will decrease the chances of serious injury by 55 percent and of fatality by 45 percent.

No distractions. Put your cell phone down and concentrate on the driving task. In 2013, 3,154 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver and an estimated additional 424,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver. Drivers who use hand-held devices are three times as likely to get into crashes serious enough to injure themselves. Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent-at 55 mph-of driving the length of an entire football field, blind.

Watch for pedestrians (and animals). Especially watch for youngsters on Trick or Treat night and especially for deer during the months of October, November and December.

Watch your speed. Travel at posted speed limits and leave a safety margin ahead of you. Be sure to adjust your speed for road conditions and weather and slow down accordingly.

Don’t drive drunk or impaired. Halloween parties may be serving adult beverages. If you are hosting an event, make sure all your guests have a sober ride home. Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk. If you have been drinking, make sure you have a designated driver for trip home.

This week is National Teen Driver Safety Week.

Combined with the increase of deer on the roads during the fall and trick-or-treat nights, October is an excellent time to remind everyone to stay particularly alert.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 43 percent of all people killed in motor vehicle crashes on Halloween night from 2009 to 2013 were in crashes involving a drunk driver.

On Halloween night alone 119 people lost their lives over that same period. Children out trick-or-treating and the parents accompanying them are also at risk as 19 percent of fatal pedestrian crashes on Halloween night (2009-2013) involved drunk drivers. Drunk drivers accounted for 23 percent of fatal pedestrian crashes on Halloween night in 2013.

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Teen driving tips:

Always wear a seat belt. Make sure you and all passengers are properly restrained. It is the single best thing you can do to avoid injury in the event of a car crash. Using your seat belt will decrease the chances of serious injury by 55 percent and of fatality by 45 percent.

No distractions. Put your cell phone down and concentrate on the driving task. In 2013, 3,154 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver and an estimated additional 424,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver. Drivers who use hand-held devices are three times as likely to get into crashes serious enough to injure themselves. Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, the equivalent-at 55 mph-of driving the length of an entire football field, blind.

Watch for pedestrians (and animals). Especially watch for youngsters on Trick or Treat night and especially for deer during the months of October, November and December.

Watch your speed. Travel at posted speed limits and leave a safety margin ahead of you. Be sure to adjust your speed for road conditions and weather and slow down accordingly.

Don’t drive drunk or impaired. Halloween parties may be serving adult beverages. If you are hosting an event, make sure all your guests have a sober ride home. Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk. If you have been drinking, make sure you have a designated driver for trip home.