Bellville two-year-old resident finds elusive snipe


By LOUISE SWARTZWALDER - lswartzwalder@civitasmedia.com



Courtesy photo The elusive, and sometimes mythical bird, a snipe, was captured in a photo recently taken outside Bellville. The snipe is mythical, when people try to fool others to go on a “snipe hunt.” Two local people, however, found one — in brown and white — in a local woods.

Courtesy photo The elusive, and sometimes mythical bird, a snipe, was captured in a photo recently taken outside Bellville. The snipe is mythical, when people try to fool others to go on a “snipe hunt.” Two local people, however, found one — in brown and white — in a local woods.


Louise Swartzwalder | The Star Hudson Miller describes his rare snipe sighting.


A precocious young man from the Bellville area can say he is a one of a kind person — because he was able to see something most people think of as a joke.

Every adult around the Bellville and Butler area could probably say they have vivid memories about tales they were told when young.

Or maybe even tales they are being told right now.

When you were a kid, people probably invited you on something called a snipe hunt.

If you were unitiated, you probably believed you were really going hunting.

To clarify things here, we’ll get real.

The dictionary, a trusted American Heritage College Dictionary, tells you a snipe hunt is “an elaborate practical joke in which an unsuspecting person takes part in a bogus hunt for a snipe…”

This person would “typically” be “left alone in the dark with instructions not to move until the snipe appears.”

Young Hudson Miller, and his “Papa” Cory Jackson, saw a snipe.

And Papa took a picture to show everyone what a snipe looks like.

The snipe is in the “long-billed shore bird” category from the genus Gallinago or Capella, says the dictionary.

It is brown and white, and does indeed have a somewhat crooked long bill.

Young Hudson, who is two going on three years old, confirms he saw a “sniper bird” with Papa, his grandfather.

He says, using hand gestures, it was a “big bird.”

Also, he confirms: “I’m tough.”

Young Hudson lives outside Bellville with his mother, Caela, and father. Their house lies on a hill, not far from the Perry church. To get to go snipe hunting, Hudson and his Papa had to march off to the woods, to the north of their house.

He informs an inquiring visitor the snipe was about two to three feet away. He is measuring the distance based on the location of a red and blue wagon on his living room floor.

Was he scared of the bird? The visitor attempts to make a fear-generating noise. It comes out: Boo.

No. And neither was Papa, says Hudson.

Does he realize his sighting is a very special thing?

“Special,” he said. And Papa is “special, too.”

He displays his willingness to move on, off the very important subject of a rare bird sighting.

He shows how he can count to ten. But he stops at five. He puts his hands up to display the numbers.

Hudson is very willing to share information about his adventures around his house. He and his mom found black raspberries, and Hudson allows as how he “ate too much.”

At first when asked about the bird sighting, he says he saw a lot of things in the woods, by the creek.

There were bears (two) that were red and blue and red.

He said he took a backpack along on the trip, plus juice.

He didn’t confirm privately-held information that he marched off with his very own burlap bag, but a friend said that is what occurred.

He said a very special piece of equipment he took along were “noculars,” so he could see better.

In two-year old English, that means “binoculars.”

He said he also took a headlamp, which he pulls on over his head to attach it to his forehead with its elastic strap.

The elastic, however, is unforgiving and gives him a good smack in the head when he tries to demonstrate.

This effort makes him a bit quiet, and the adult in the room — mom — says he will soon have to think about his nap.

Because he is sociable, he seems to have thought of inviting friends along on another snipe hunt.

Do you want to invite people, he is asked.

“Yeah.”

Information about the bird — the real brown and white bird — came from Uncle Craig, who Caela, Hudson’s mom, refers to as the “bird nerd.”

He seemed to have the other bit of privately-held information: that snipes are real.

Courtesy photo The elusive, and sometimes mythical bird, a snipe, was captured in a photo recently taken outside Bellville. The snipe is mythical, when people try to fool others to go on a “snipe hunt.” Two local people, however, found one — in brown and white — in a local woods.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/39/2016/07/web1_20160709_154439-1-.jpgCourtesy photo The elusive, and sometimes mythical bird, a snipe, was captured in a photo recently taken outside Bellville. The snipe is mythical, when people try to fool others to go on a “snipe hunt.” Two local people, however, found one — in brown and white — in a local woods.

Louise Swartzwalder | The Star Hudson Miller describes his rare snipe sighting.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/39/2016/07/web1_kid.jpgLouise Swartzwalder | The Star Hudson Miller describes his rare snipe sighting.

By LOUISE SWARTZWALDER

lswartzwalder@civitasmedia.com

Reach Louise at 419-886-2291 ext. 1982

Reach Louise at 419-886-2291 ext. 1982