Locals provide help to hurricane victims


By LOUISE SWARTZWALDER - lswartzwalder@aimmediamidwest.com



Terry Frazier, who worked with Clear Fork Alliance Church, in its project to get supplies to people in Texas, who were harmed by Hurricane Harvey. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star

Terry Frazier, who worked with Clear Fork Alliance Church, in its project to get supplies to people in Texas, who were harmed by Hurricane Harvey. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star


CLEAR FORK VALLEY — People know this time of year makes a person want to think of just good things.

With the days dwindling before Dec. 25, Christmas Day, a group of stalwart believers in this area have taken their faith a bit farther.

People with the Clear Fork Alliance Church and four others put their efforts together to get needed items to people in Texas, who had been hit by Hurricane Harvey.

Terry Frazier, a member of that church, said he thought his contribution to relief efforts was over when he gave a donation.

But then, he said he was sitting in his easy chair at home, and saw sights of the destruction on television.

He said he prayed and asked “if the Lord wants us to do anymore.”

Frazier said the Lord would “open the door and show us.”

He visited Cowen Truck Line, Inc. where he had formerly worked, and mentioned it would be nice if they could get a truck and trailer to haul items to Texas. He said Tim Cowen, the president, said ok.

That means the “first door” was opened, he said.

He talked to the pastor at Clear Fork, Mike Stine, who said he would contact other churches. A group of them “then stepped up.” Those churches were Hilltop Community Church, Grace Evangelical Free Church, Heartland Alliance Church and North Liberty United Methodist Church.

The five churches got together a truck and trailer load of supplies: $4,300 worth of drywall, doors, insulation, sheet rock, paint, nail guns, and other items.

Mansfield Plumbing Produces donated 20 pedestal sinks, which Frazier said is an expensive item.

People at Lowe’s, Menard’s and other locations were quick to hand out supplies.

Frazier said he had thought he would do the driving himself, but found out he couldn’t because some of the requirements to drive a large truck had lapsed.

Cowen provided a truck and trailer, fuel and also a veteran driver, said Frazier.

The people wishing to help at first thought they could send things like toilet paper, said Stine. A person associated with the southwest district of the Christian Missionary Alliance churches said the more substantial supplies were needed.

The trip to Texas and back was run the way a trek by commercial haulers would have been.

Frazier said he and his driver took a load to one stop, dropped it, and went to the second stop. This means Frazier didn’t have time to talk to any of the people in Texas who were affected by the hurricane.

The trip lasted from Nov. 13 to 15.

Frazier said when he got back he “couldn’t shut up” about his trip.

He said people in this area have “jewels of great price.”

People here haven’t had to suffer through a hurricane, a tsunami or forest fires, he said.

When Frazier worked for Cowen, he and his wife, Evie, were team drivers. He said they would “visit home,” because he worked for 26 years and put in two million miles.

He said a driver picks up and delivers, and if he or she can’t do it on time, “someone else will.”

Stine said he thinks Frazier was inspired by Abbie Sites, with Clear Fork Alliance Church. She had made a trip to Texas to provide help and had a slide show when she returned.

Several people with Clear Fork Alliance and the other churches provided stand-out performances, Stine said.

He mentioned Bob Bieri, with Clear Fork Alliance; Jeremy Hughes with Hilltop and Morris Hill, of Grace Evangelical.

One person helped by the Clear Fork area workers sent an email. It says “We appreciate you and your concerns. This will help us start to make our home back to a home.”

It is signed by Judy and Joaquin Trent and family.

Terry Frazier, who worked with Clear Fork Alliance Church, in its project to get supplies to people in Texas, who were harmed by Hurricane Harvey. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star
https://www.thebellvillestar.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/39/2017/12/web1_frazier.jpgTerry Frazier, who worked with Clear Fork Alliance Church, in its project to get supplies to people in Texas, who were harmed by Hurricane Harvey. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star

By LOUISE SWARTZWALDER

lswartzwalder@aimmediamidwest.com