Clear Fork school work progressing; band to get four new sousaphones


By LOUISE SWARTZWALDER - lswartzwalder@aimmediamidwest.com



Clear Fork music teacher Jason Brasure stands with a forlorn looking sousaphone that has been held together with tape. He appeared before the Clear Fork school board to ask for help in acquiring four new instruments. A sousaphone is similar to a tuba but has been adapted for use in marching bands. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star

Clear Fork music teacher Jason Brasure stands with a forlorn looking sousaphone that has been held together with tape. He appeared before the Clear Fork school board to ask for help in acquiring four new instruments. A sousaphone is similar to a tuba but has been adapted for use in marching bands. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star


CLEAR FORK VALLEY — School board members and valley residents were given several forms of good news at the Monday meeting of the Clear Fork Valley Schools board of education.

Construction at the two new elementary schools is progressing, Brad Geissman of Adena Corporation told everyone.

He said he had hoped to be telling everyone it was “not snowing.”

The shell is 95 per cent complete in Butler, Geissman said. In Bellville the shell is 35 to 40 per cent complete. Bids have been received from groups interested in doing asbestos abatement, and those bids came in at a little below the budget numbers.

Told the sousaphones the school uses are 50 years old, the board agreed to provide enough money to supplement $10,000 the Clear Fork Valley Music Boosters is furnishing to buy four new instruments. This means $10,000 will come from the schools budget.

The school district has saved $19,000 by using the advice of Kevin Carr, who said LED lights should be installed. That was done, to the benefit of the district, treasurer Bradd Stevens told everyone.

The situation of the school district in internal enrollment is similar to that of most districts, Stevens said. This district has been put on a “guarantee” in funding from the state Department of Education. But all districts have been told the state wants to get away from that kind of funding.

Board president Kyle Beveridge asked if this means the district could lose state money. Stevens said it could be, but it is difficult to predict now because of the complicated formula the state uses to decide who gets money.

The board authorized Stevens to go out for bid for auctioneer services for the sale of land in the Hamilton Hills area of Bellville. The state requires a district to do that if the value of something is more than $10,000.

The sale of land there has been advocated by Beveridge, who said he has talked to people who would be interested in developing that land for residential uses. Beveridge has said he is interested in bringing more people in to this district.

The board affirmed an earlier decision that the building on Hines Avenue be demolished.

School distrcit superintendent Janice Wyckoff said the previous board voted to demolish that structure once the two new buildings are up, and doing that would save the district money.

Beveridge said he had “not been too keen” on tearing down that buidling, but when he saw new information he changed his mind. The new Butler building was proposed to be built for 358 students, and there are currently 305. This number can change depending on foster and special educatioin placements, Stevens said. There is also room in the annex building associated with the schools.

Students in the lower grades occupy that building, as do Wyckoff and Stevens. This is where board of education offices are located.

Wyckoff said the board offices and personnel could be “put on vans and circle around” because no firm decision has been made on where they would be located.

The bids for demolishing the Hines building came in at $176,000. It had been estimated it would cost $300,000.

She said the financial figures probably mean “now we’re going to get our playground.”

Clear Fork music teacher Jason Brasure stands with a forlorn looking sousaphone that has been held together with tape. He appeared before the Clear Fork school board to ask for help in acquiring four new instruments. A sousaphone is similar to a tuba but has been adapted for use in marching bands. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star
https://www.thebellvillestar.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/39/2018/04/web1_tuba-1.jpgClear Fork music teacher Jason Brasure stands with a forlorn looking sousaphone that has been held together with tape. He appeared before the Clear Fork school board to ask for help in acquiring four new instruments. A sousaphone is similar to a tuba but has been adapted for use in marching bands. Louise Swartzwalder | Bellville Star

By LOUISE SWARTZWALDER

lswartzwalder@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Swartzwalder at aimmmedimidwest.com

Reach Swartzwalder at aimmmedimidwest.com